Time to Transition Your Houseplants Back Indoors

TIME TO TRANSITION YOUR HOUSEPLANTS BACK INDOORS

How to make the switch and help them thrive

The nights are getting cooler, and after a blazing hot summer, it feels like a welcome change. And while we throw up the windows and pull out our sweaters, the houseplants we have on the porch and patio can’t quite beat the nighttime chill. They’re ready to come back indoors.  

As someone who grows, you know it’s kind of an art. You’ve started to notice the little adjustments that make your plants happier. So, before you gather them all for the move, there are a few small things you can do to make the transition easier on your plants, and on you. 

 

1) KEEP THINGS CLEAN.      

We’re big fans of bugs, just not in our houses. So take a few minutes to check your plants for tiny insects like spider mites and aphids and remove them. We also like to take our plants to the lawn and use the hose or a pitcher of water to gently wash, then wipe the leaves with a soft cloth. 

As an added precaution, treat with neem oil, a natural pesticide that’s actually oil pressed from the fruits and seeds of the neem evergreen tree.  

 

2) REPOT IF THINGS ARE GETTING TIGHT.  

Your plant may have grown over the summer and it’s good to give it some room. Choose a pot that’s about two inches larger than the old one. 

You can even lightly prune your plant before repotting. Just remember: no more than one third of the plant and be sure to mirror that level of pruning for the roots before you repot. 

 

3) MOVE AHEAD SLOWLY AND STEADILY.    

Your plants having been living in the sunshine and fresh air, like you have. So moving indoors full time can be a shock to the system. 

Take things slowly. Begin by bringing in your plants at night, then moving back outside in the morning. Gradually and over the course of 2-3 weeks, increase the amount of time your plants spend inside until you keep them in full-time for winter. 

 

4) WATCH THE WATER AND LIGHT.  

Light and humidity levels will change quite a bit from outside to inside. And even though your plant can thrive indoors, you’ll want to make sure it’s getting enough sunlight. 

If you still have your plant tag (most people don’t), check for light requirements. If not, try Googling your plant to see how much direct or indirect sunlight it needs or send us a picture if you’re not sure of its name. 

One more thing: your plant won’t need nearly as much water indoors. So check frequently, but water only when it’s dry to the touch. 

 

Have questions or want to know more about moving houseplants indoors this winter? Please stop in or give us a call at (603) 472-8880. 

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